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Use of Time – The Organized Disposition: “My time is for getting things done!”

Different Dispositions use time in different ways. If you want to develop harmonious relationships with your family members, co-workers, students or others you interact with, you will want to know how they use time.

People with this organizing Disposition have an “outside-in” view of how to use time. They look outside themselves to the needs of the calendar, the day and the work situation to determine how to use their time. They enjoy “being on top of things” and are committed to organization, planning, and keeping order.

These people probably invented the clock! The clock divides up and organizes their day. They keep appointment books and make schedules and plans for how to use their time. They make sure they arrive at appointments on time and feel concerned, sad or upset if they don’t.

Getting things done on time and checking items off a To-Do list are a great source of pleasure, and they often expect the same from others, which can be a source of misunderstandings and disharmony.  Organized Disposition people will turn down opportunities for fun, relaxation and entertainment if those activities would interfere with getting things done on time or following through with their routine.

Others think of Organized Disposition people as punctual, orderly, efficient, reliable and hard workers because they are. They can also be seen as overly serious and time conscious or too rigid and inflexible when it comes to keeping order and sticking to “the” schedule.

They make great team members for overall project planning and management and will deliver your project on time and on budget!

Copyright 2020 by VKHodson & MPelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute • reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Use of Time – The Curious Disposition: “My time is for solving problems!”

Different Dispositions use time in different ways. If you want to develop harmonious relationships with your family members, co-workers, students or others you interact with, you will want to know how they use time.

People with this inventive Disposition have an “Inside-out” view of time. They want their time to serve their needs for discovery, coming up with a better way to do things, getting to the root of a problem. For them, they see something that needs improving upon and they start tinkering and experimenting and rearranging things until they have a solution that makes life easier, more fun and/or more interesting.  What seems like “fiddling around with stuff” to others is a pleasant way of passing time to the Curious person. 

Curious Dispositions see clock time as too rigid for their desire to explore and invent until they have a solution. When they are lost in their discovery zone, it’s easy for them to forget entirely about clock time and arrive late for appointments or not at all. Having to stop doing something they are deeply involved in means putting off the feeling of accomplishment they get when they find a solution or a new way forward.

For people with this Disposition, time spent experimenting and discovering is more important than daily responsibilities – this is the “absentminded professor” trait – they can even forget to eat when involved in a project! They like open-ended projects without strict due dates, so they can take all the time they need to solve the problem at hand. Curious Disposition people have an internal sense of when their project is finished, and they resist being rushed by schedules and external deadlines.

Others might think of them as anti-social, inconsiderate, uncooperative, overly serious and hyper-focused.

They make great team members when you want a genuinely solution-focused person to spend hours getting to the bottom of issues in novel ways.

If you have a Curious Disposition yourself, knowing your default setting for your use of time can lead to a better understanding of yourself and help you to devise strategies for those times when watching the clock is important or being more organized is important (for appointments, plans with someone, etc).

If you have Curious Disposition people in your life, knowing their default setting for their use of time can lead to more understanding, better communication, and increased ability to get along.

Copyright 2020 by VKHodson & MPelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute • reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Use of Time – The Supportive Disposition: “My time is for helping others!”

Different Dispositions use time in different ways. If you want to develop harmonious relationships with your family members, co-workers, students or others you interact with, you will want to know how they use time.

People with this interactive Disposition have an “outside-in” view of how to use time. They look outside themselves to the needs of others to determine how to use their time. They care for and help others as well as create cooperation, harmony and community among people. For them, making sure others are taken care of and have what they need is often more important than taking care of their own responsibilities.

These people lose track of time when connecting with and helping others. Sometimes, wanting to be helpful, they miss the mark entirely by giving help where it isn’t wanted. They will skip an appointment to help a friend in need.

Some people who like being looked after, see Supportive Disposition people as generous and great friends who are always there for them. Others would appreciate it if Supportive Disposition people spent their time minding their own business and taking care of themselves.

They make great team members for creating cohesiveness, harmony and cooperation in a group.

If you have a Supportive Disposition yourself, knowing your default setting for your use of time can lead to a better understanding of yourself and help you to devise strategies for those times when you need some self-care.

If you have Supportive Disposition people in your life, knowing their default setting for their use of time can lead to more understanding, better communication, and increased ability to get along.

Copyright 2020 by VKHodson & MPelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute • reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Use of Time – The Spontaneous Disposition: “My time is for making me happy!”

Different Dispositions use time in different ways. If you want to develop harmonious relationships with your family members, co-workers, students or others you interact with, you will want to know how they use time.

People with this active Disposition have an “Inside-out” view of time. They want their time to serve their needs for movement, fun, entertainment, and to be a center of attention. For them, one action leads to another in a flow that is enjoyable to them but might look disconnected and random to someone else. What seems like arbitrary action to others is an energizing way of passing time to the Spontaneous person. Time spent feeling free and as unrestrained as possible is needed to balance out the time they are expected to be focused and attentive.

Photo by Snapwire on Pexels.com

Spontaneous Disposition people find clock-time challenging to accept. it’s easy for them to forget about clock time and arrive late for appointments or not at all. If they want to do something, they will do it anytime (sometimes night or day) as long as it serves their need for fun. They can change from one activity to another quickly, with no advance warning. They enjoy the feeling of freedom and vitality they get when doing something new and different.

Those with a Spontaneous Disposition usually want activities to take a short amount of time, lose interest easily, and often make plans only to change them.

Others might think of them as scattered, unfocused, not serious, uncooperative, untrustworthy.

They make great team members when you want that spark of fun, laughter, wit and humor that they bring to a group.

If you have a Spontaneous Disposition yourself, knowing your default setting for your use of time can lead to a better understanding of yourself and help you to devise strategies for those times when watching the clock is important or being more organized is important (for appointments, plans with someone, etc).

If you have Spontaneous Disposition people in your life, knowing their default setting for their use of time can lead to more understanding, better communication, and increased ability to get along.

Copyright 2020 by VKHodson & MPelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute • reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Use of Time – The Imaginative Disposition: “My time is for thinking and creating!”

Different Dispositions use time in different ways. If you want to develop harmonious relationships with your family members, co-workers, students or others you interact with, you will want to know how they use time.

People with this creative Disposition have an “inside-out” view of time. They want their time to serve their needs for observation, wonder, thinking, daydreaming and creating. For them, one thought leads to another in a flow that makes sense to them but might not make sense to someone else. What seems like aimlessness to others is a pleasant way of passing time to the Imaginative person and might provide the idea for a new creative work. It’s the time spent “free floating” that is the engine for their creativity.

If Imaginative Disposition people ruled the world, there might not be any clocks. When they are lost in their thinking or creating zone, it’s easy for them to forget about clock time and arrive late for appointments or not at all. Having to stop doing something they are deeply involved in means taking the chance of losing a train of thought or forgetting something they need to advance them to a creative outcome—a poem, a story, a song they are composing or learning to play on the piano.

To Imaginative Disposition people time spent thinking and creating is more important than their daily responsibilities. They like open-ended projects without strict due dates, so they can take all the time they need to bring their creations into being. Imaginative Disposition people have an internal sense of when they have completed something and resist schedules and external deadlines.

Others might think they are lazy, unfocused, changeable, inconsistent, inconsiderate, uncooperative, “drifty”, “spacy”, not serious and/or untrustworthy.

They make great team members when you want new, “out of the box” ideas.

If you have an Imaginative Disposition yourself, knowing your default setting for your use of time can lead to a better understanding of yourself and help you to devise strategies for those times when watching the clock is important (for appointments, plans with someone, etc).

If you have Imaginative Disposition people in your life, knowing their default setting for their use of time can lead to more understanding, better communication, and increased ability to get along.

Copyright 2020 by VKHodson & MPelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute • reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Teaching the Organized Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICScalendar
Organized Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are structured by nature; have sequential, ordered components; offer routine and drill; and give opportunity to take notes and be organized. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are logical and sequential, allow the use of workbooks, and involve planning, scheduling, and due dates.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Classifying living things, diagramming sentences, and learning to alphabetize are examples of subjects that are structured by nature and have sequential, ordered components. Workbooks and worksheets are examples of materials that offer routine and drill. Developing timelines and outlines are examples of activities that involve logical arrangement and organization. Multiple-choice tests and fill-in-the-blank questions are examples of techniques that provide opportunities for note-taking and memorizing. Some of the traditional methods used in classrooms such as book reports and research papers work well because they involve due dates, planning, and scheduling of time.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • tick_tock-800x533 producing clockProvide a quiet space away from disorder or chaos.
  • Allow the student to have a consistent routine for homework, including a scheduled time.
  • Help the student memorize by being available to practice with flash cards or listen to the student recite.
  • Remind the student to highlight information in textbooks (if allowed to mark the books) or to outline or use information mapping  when studying for tests.
  • An open-classroom type of setting might be too chaotic for this student. Ask the teacher to allow the student to have a routine or place the student in a more structured classroom setting.
  • It is easy to take this learner for granted and provide only workbook-type activities. As long as a lesson is organized and sequential, adding some fun can enhance learning for this child.
  • Involve this learner in methods and materials that add a creative dimension and broaden the learning experience. This learner needs a break from the routine and rote assignments, just as much as the other learners.

starsMOTIVATORS
Organized Disposition people people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being organized, neat, productive, efficient, and punctual. They are also highly motivated by the chance to set goals, by personal approval, and by “good job” comments, stickers on papers, and grades.

 

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Teaching the Imaginative Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS
Imaginative Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are creative by nature, have artistic or philosophical aspects, offer beauty and aesthetics, provide artistic nature-sky-sunset-manexpression, and give plenty of opportunity to wonder, think, and dream. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used allow for time alone and involve arts and/or the creative process.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Literature, poetry, art, and drama are examples of subjects that are creative by nature UM62EOZSRCand give plenty of opportunity to wonder, think, and express oneself imaginatively. Drawing pictures to understand a math concept or writing a poem to remember history facts are examples of techniques that allow creative expression. Listening to music while reading, doodling while listening to a presentation, or doing assignments in a quiet spot surrounded by nature are examples of activities that support the need for aesthetics and beauty.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Encourage drawing and doodling during study times.
  • Experiment with different types of music in the background when studying for tests—Baroque is especially good for helping some children focus.
  • Provide time and space for quiet, alone time.
  • Encourage the student to draw pictures or write a poem to understand a concept or summarize a lesson or book; suggest writing a song or setting the information to a familiar melody.
  • Encourage information mapping with pictures when studying for tests or to make information more understandable and manageable when reading chapters on any subject.
  • Allow posters, collages, poems, or other artistic presentations in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORS240H
Imaginative Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being creative, artistic, open, and observant. They are also highly motivated by the chance to work on creative projects, the opportunity to have alone time, and having their work displayed or recognized in some way.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Teaching the Supportive Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS
CommunitySupportive Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are social by nature, involve human-behavior issues, incorporate personal feelings, and give plenty of opportunity to interact. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used offer individualization, involve small groups, and allow cooperative interaction.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
science-students-1241156Journalism, psychology, counseling, and speech are examples of subjects that are social by nature and give plenty of opportunity to talk and discuss. Learning history through stories about people, conducting interviews for research, and corresponding with pen pals to develop writing skills are examples of techniques that look at human behavior issues and provide a personal touch. Working on cooperative projects and having group discussions are examples of activities that allow time to relate and offer the chance to develop team spirit.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Recognize the student’s need to discuss and talk through the lesson.
  • Encourage study techniques that involve relating, studying with another person, alternating reading aloud to each other, discussing the meaning of the lesson.
  • Pretend the student is involved in the subject being studied—if she were Madame Curie why would she have become a scientist, if she had been a Pilgrim how would she have felt in the New World?
  • Encourage the student to do oral presentations to an imaginary audience when studying for a test—it is his job to convince the audience of the importance of the information.
  • Relate lessons to social events—e.g. if the child is doing addition problems, pretend the numbers relate to giving a party: Three people said they were coming to the party, then two more came, how many came all together?
  • Allow small-group interaction, working with a partner on cooperative projects or writing assignments, more discussion time, and taped “interviews” or oral presentations in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORS
people talkingSupportive Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for noticing others and for being kind, fair, thoughtful, and considerate. They are also highly motivated by the chance to talk, getting a personal note or pat on the back, and receiving personal attention.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Teaching the Curious Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICSboard-953156__180
Curious Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are experimental by nature, that provide inspiration and new solutions, and that give opportunities to question, design, and discover. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are direct and offer “intellectual” ideas, theories, models, and time for exploration.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Engineering, electronics, architectural designing, and the sciences are subjects that are experimentfamily group interactionsal by nature and give plenty of opportunity to question, design, and discover. Doing experiments or constructing theoretical models are examples of techniques that inspire exploration and new approaches to old problems. Independent projects and “intellectual” debates are examples of activities that tap these students’ problem-solving skills.

 

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Engage the student in a debate on the subject being studied.
  • Encourage study techniques that involve drawing or constructing a model—this could be as simple as information mapping.
  • Provide computer programs to teach or reinforce a subject.
  • Have brainstorming sessions; “collect” and “classify” the information.
  • Provide hands-on models or visual representations (videos, DVDs) whenever possible for the subjects being studied.
  • Allow projects in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORSmodern architecture
Curious Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being clever and smart, for making discoveries, and for solving problems. It is also highly motivating for them when people actually put to use their contributions, inventions, and technical know-how.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

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Teaching the Spontaneous Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICSbike in air
Spontaneous Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are entertaining by nature, have immediate relevance, offer variety and challenge, provide hands-on experiences, and give plenty of opportunity to move, act, and do. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are short and to the point, allow movement, and involve games, manipulatives, and audiovisuals.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Filmmaking, learning to play a sport, and building a rocket are examples of subjects that are entertaining by nature and give plenty of opportunity to move, act, and do. Applying Jumpmath principles to designing and constructing a skate-board ramp or working with maps to plan a vacation trip are examples of activities that provide immediate relevance and hands-on experience. Playing basketball to learn math facts or a board game to develop reading skills are also examples of activities that allow movement and offer variety and challenge.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Encourage movement breaks every fifteen to twenty minutes when doing paper-and-pencil assignments.trampoline
  • Encourage study techniques that involve movement—e.g., to memorize math facts, spread flash cards on the ground, bounce a ball on a card, then shoot a basket while reciting the fact. Any activity involving hopping, jumping, skipping, running, or dancing is great.
  • Play board games or computer games to teach or reinforce any subject matter, including history, geography, science, math, or a foreign language. Or make up your own game!
  • Help the student to put on a skit or demonstration to show understanding of the material when studying for a test; suggest the student act like a reporter and tape the lesson, then play it back; have the student set the information to a familiar song and sing it.
  • Relate the lesson to a “real-life” situation when possible; for example, the math equation 3 × 5 = ____ is like knowing five people and having to get each of them three presents, so how many total presents do you have to buy?
  • Allow skits or demonstrations in place of written reports

girl jumpingMOTIVATORS
Spontaneous people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being fun, witty, clever, and bringing enjoyment to others. They are also highly motivated by the chance to have free time, by the opportunity to choose their activities, and by being allowed to entertain.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com