Teaching the Organized Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICScalendar
Organized Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are structured by nature; have sequential, ordered components; offer routine and drill; and give opportunity to take notes and be organized. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are logical and sequential, allow the use of workbooks, and involve planning, scheduling, and due dates.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Classifying living things, diagramming sentences, and learning to alphabetize are examples of subjects that are structured by nature and have sequential, ordered components. Workbooks and worksheets are examples of materials that offer routine and drill. Developing timelines and outlines are examples of activities that involve logical arrangement and organization. Multiple-choice tests and fill-in-the-blank questions are examples of techniques that provide opportunities for note-taking and memorizing. Some of the traditional methods used in classrooms such as book reports and research papers work well because they involve due dates, planning, and scheduling of time.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • tick_tock-800x533 producing clockProvide a quiet space away from disorder or chaos.
  • Allow the student to have a consistent routine for homework, including a scheduled time.
  • Help the student memorize by being available to practice with flash cards or listen to the student recite.
  • Remind the student to highlight information in textbooks (if allowed to mark the books) or to outline or use information mapping  when studying for tests.
  • An open-classroom type of setting might be too chaotic for this student. Ask the teacher to allow the student to have a routine or place the student in a more structured classroom setting.
  • It is easy to take this learner for granted and provide only workbook-type activities. As long as a lesson is organized and sequential, adding some fun can enhance learning for this child.
  • Involve this learner in methods and materials that add a creative dimension and broaden the learning experience. This learner needs a break from the routine and rote assignments, just as much as the other learners.

starsMOTIVATORS
Organized Disposition people people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being organized, neat, productive, efficient, and punctual. They are also highly motivated by the chance to set goals, by personal approval, and by “good job” comments, stickers on papers, and grades.

 

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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Teaching the Imaginative Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS
Imaginative Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are creative by nature, have artistic or philosophical aspects, offer beauty and aesthetics, provide artistic nature-sky-sunset-manexpression, and give plenty of opportunity to wonder, think, and dream. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used allow for time alone and involve arts and/or the creative process.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Literature, poetry, art, and drama are examples of subjects that are creative by nature UM62EOZSRCand give plenty of opportunity to wonder, think, and express oneself imaginatively. Drawing pictures to understand a math concept or writing a poem to remember history facts are examples of techniques that allow creative expression. Listening to music while reading, doodling while listening to a presentation, or doing assignments in a quiet spot surrounded by nature are examples of activities that support the need for aesthetics and beauty.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Encourage drawing and doodling during study times.
  • Experiment with different types of music in the background when studying for tests—Baroque is especially good for helping some children focus.
  • Provide time and space for quiet, alone time.
  • Encourage the student to draw pictures or write a poem to understand a concept or summarize a lesson or book; suggest writing a song or setting the information to a familiar melody.
  • Encourage information mapping with pictures when studying for tests or to make information more understandable and manageable when reading chapters on any subject.
  • Allow posters, collages, poems, or other artistic presentations in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORS240H
Imaginative Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being creative, artistic, open, and observant. They are also highly motivated by the chance to work on creative projects, the opportunity to have alone time, and having their work displayed or recognized in some way.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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Teaching the Supportive Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICS
CommunitySupportive Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are social by nature, involve human-behavior issues, incorporate personal feelings, and give plenty of opportunity to interact. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used offer individualization, involve small groups, and allow cooperative interaction.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
science-students-1241156Journalism, psychology, counseling, and speech are examples of subjects that are social by nature and give plenty of opportunity to talk and discuss. Learning history through stories about people, conducting interviews for research, and corresponding with pen pals to develop writing skills are examples of techniques that look at human behavior issues and provide a personal touch. Working on cooperative projects and having group discussions are examples of activities that allow time to relate and offer the chance to develop team spirit.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Recognize the student’s need to discuss and talk through the lesson.
  • Encourage study techniques that involve relating, studying with another person, alternating reading aloud to each other, discussing the meaning of the lesson.
  • Pretend the student is involved in the subject being studied—if she were Madame Curie why would she have become a scientist, if she had been a Pilgrim how would she have felt in the New World?
  • Encourage the student to do oral presentations to an imaginary audience when studying for a test—it is his job to convince the audience of the importance of the information.
  • Relate lessons to social events—e.g. if the child is doing addition problems, pretend the numbers relate to giving a party: Three people said they were coming to the party, then two more came, how many came all together?
  • Allow small-group interaction, working with a partner on cooperative projects or writing assignments, more discussion time, and taped “interviews” or oral presentations in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORS
people talkingSupportive Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for noticing others and for being kind, fair, thoughtful, and considerate. They are also highly motivated by the chance to talk, getting a personal note or pat on the back, and receiving personal attention.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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Teaching the Curious Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICSboard-953156__180
Curious Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are experimental by nature, that provide inspiration and new solutions, and that give opportunities to question, design, and discover. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are direct and offer “intellectual” ideas, theories, models, and time for exploration.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Engineering, electronics, architectural designing, and the sciences are subjects that are experimentfamily group interactionsal by nature and give plenty of opportunity to question, design, and discover. Doing experiments or constructing theoretical models are examples of techniques that inspire exploration and new approaches to old problems. Independent projects and “intellectual” debates are examples of activities that tap these students’ problem-solving skills.

 

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Engage the student in a debate on the subject being studied.
  • Encourage study techniques that involve drawing or constructing a model—this could be as simple as information mapping.
  • Provide computer programs to teach or reinforce a subject.
  • Have brainstorming sessions; “collect” and “classify” the information.
  • Provide hands-on models or visual representations (videos, DVDs) whenever possible for the subjects being studied.
  • Allow projects in place of written reports.

MOTIVATORSmodern architecture
Curious Disposition people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being clever and smart, for making discoveries, and for solving problems. It is also highly motivating for them when people actually put to use their contributions, inventions, and technical know-how.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

Teaching the Spontaneous Disposition Student

LEARNING CHARACTERISTICSbike in air
Spontaneous Disposition people prefer subjects and activities that are entertaining by nature, have immediate relevance, offer variety and challenge, provide hands-on experiences, and give plenty of opportunity to move, act, and do. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniques used are short and to the point, allow movement, and involve games, manipulatives, and audiovisuals.

IDEAL CURRICULUM
Filmmaking, learning to play a sport, and building a rocket are examples of subjects that are entertaining by nature and give plenty of opportunity to move, act, and do. Applying Jumpmath principles to designing and constructing a skate-board ramp or working with maps to plan a vacation trip are examples of activities that provide immediate relevance and hands-on experience. Playing basketball to learn math facts or a board game to develop reading skills are also examples of activities that allow movement and offer variety and challenge.

HOMEWORK HELPS

  • Encourage movement breaks every fifteen to twenty minutes when doing paper-and-pencil assignments.trampoline
  • Encourage study techniques that involve movement—e.g., to memorize math facts, spread flash cards on the ground, bounce a ball on a card, then shoot a basket while reciting the fact. Any activity involving hopping, jumping, skipping, running, or dancing is great.
  • Play board games or computer games to teach or reinforce any subject matter, including history, geography, science, math, or a foreign language. Or make up your own game!
  • Help the student to put on a skit or demonstration to show understanding of the material when studying for a test; suggest the student act like a reporter and tape the lesson, then play it back; have the student set the information to a familiar song and sing it.
  • Relate the lesson to a “real-life” situation when possible; for example, the math equation 3 × 5 = ____ is like knowing five people and having to get each of them three presents, so how many total presents do you have to buy?
  • Allow skits or demonstrations in place of written reports

girl jumpingMOTIVATORS
Spontaneous people are motivated when they are acknowledged for being fun, witty, clever, and bringing enjoyment to others. They are also highly motivated by the chance to have free time, by the opportunity to choose their activities, and by being allowed to entertain.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis/Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
powertraitsforlife.com, reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com

Relieving Homework Stress – and now it’s ALL Home Work!

This article was originally written with homework in mind. Now that ALL school work is home work, it seemed like a good time to remind parents and teachers of these strategies for different learners.

Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners
Hands-On and Whole Body Learners need to move. That is how they do their best learning. Tips:

1. Teach them to take movement breaks
Set a timer for every 15 to 30 minutes (depending on age) – student works for that period then takes a break for 5 or 10 minutes: walks around the room, jumps rope, runs around outside, etc.

2. Exercise ball
Experiment with student sitting on an exercise ball – the slight, ongoing movement of the ball might be enough for the student to focus for longer periods.CZICAIIEUI

3. Build movement into the work itself
For example, if a student has facts to memorize, try bouncing a ball in rhythm, or shooting baskets, or jumping rope, or bouncing on trampoline while rehearsing the information. Or, student can record the information to be memorized and then walk or jog while listening to the recording.

4. Stress balls
Encourage student to use stress balls or other squeeze toys while working.

5. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Picture Learners
Picture Learners need to see. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need visuals to increase comprehension and memory of what they are stLego Math photoudying. Tips:

1. Teach them to find visuals and make use of them
Whatever topic a student is studying, chances are there is visual information available on the internet – pictures, charts, maps, as well as videos.

2. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Listening or Verbal Learners
Listening Learners need to hear the information spoken. Verbal Learners need to hear the sound of their own voices. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need audio to increase comprehension and memoryheadphones of what they are studying. Tips:

1. Audiobooks
Whenever possible, provide audio versions of books and texts. Use headphones if that is helpful.

2. Hearing their own voices
Encourage students to read aloud, or record themselves reading the material to be studied, then listening to it later.

3. Discussion
Provide opportunities for one-to-one or small group discussion, if possible.

For more free information about all of your child’s learning styles, go to powertraitsforlife.com or

Use this link for a special $10.00 discount on our Self-Portrait™ Power Traits Assessment

copyright 2020 by M. Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC

LearningSuccess™ Tip: Reminder About Lighting

People are lampsaffected differently by various lighting situations, which can then affect focus and concentration when learning or working.

Is the lighting bright or low, natural or artificial? If artificial, is it incandescent, fluorescent, or full-spectrum?

Fluorescent lighting has been shown to negatively affect children and adults. It can cause headaches, difficulty reading, eyestrain, irritability, and hyperactive behavior. Plants will not survive under fluorescent lighting but we expect people to!

Full-spectrum lighting, commonly used to grow indoor plants, more closely resembles the full spectrum of light present in nature. Positive effects have been documented in classrooms that have switched to this lighting.

If you have fluorescent lighting at home, try switching to full-spectrum. It could make a big difference in attitude and productivity for the whole family.Picture1

What if a student does better with natural lighting? Try moving that student near a window in the classroom, or at home when doing homework.

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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Sitting, Standing, Or…?

While some students need to sit up at a table or desk to do their best work or thinking, just as many do better in other positions.

girl reading on floorReclining or sitting on a bed, couch, bean bag chair, or the floor are alternatives.

Still others need to be standing up, perhaps working at an easel, a board on the wall, or a tall drafting table.startup-photos-large

Being able to get up frequently and walk around might be desirable. Some people do their best thinking when they are moving!

At home, you and your child can experiment with different arrangements. Options for body position include:

  • Sitting: desk, table, floor, bean bag chair, bouncy ball
  • Reclining: bed, couch, floorsitting on ball
  • Standing: easel, board, drafting table, counter

If you have an exercise ball around the house, try offering it to a child that needs to “move”—these are being used in many classrooms now with great results!

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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LearningSuccess™ Tip: Sound Matters

People are affected differently by various sounds or noise levels when working or studying. This goes for adults as well as young people. The sounds in their environments can greatly affect focus and concentration.

Some people need complete quiet when they need to concentrate. Others actually cannot concentrmegaphoneate when it is too quiet—they need some noise in the background. The type of noise varies with the individual, for example, music, people talking, street noise, etc.

When students are studying or doing any kind of school work at home, it helps to know what works best for them in terms of sound.

What if you have one child that needs total quiet and another that needs music? What if both need quiet but there are other things going on around them.

It might be time for a family meeting to discuss what can be done to meet as many needs as possible for each individual.

How about headphones for the person who does better with music? Ear plugs for those headphoneswho need quiet?

Perhaps those who need to hear talking in the background can work in the family room and those who need quiet would be in a separate room or quiet nook.

Having this discussion and making a few adjustments can go a long way to facilitating more effective learning!

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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Disability Diagnosis vs Strengths Focus

Did you know that the majority of the population are Hands-On or Picture Learners?

Yet most teaching is geared for Listening and Print learners who are also schedule-oriented, linear learners. These people make up about 1% of the population! These are the 3-5 students in any classroom who get all the A’s.

 Hands-on and Picture Learners are often considered “special needs” learners because they do not learn in the “normal” way. But how is “normal” being defined?  Is it normal just because it’s been done this way for years in traditional classrooms? Or, will we use the scientific definition of “normal” which translates to “the majority’?

Hands-On Learners make up 50-60% of the population, 80% when combined with Picture Learners. These are potentially the most brilliant people: mechanics, engineers, builders, architects, artists, musicians, scientists, inventors, and entrepreneurs.

What would happen if the classroom became a place that truly provided for these “normal, average” learners? The result would be that the Hands-On and Picture Learners would become the “A” students.

Instead, these are the learners who are labeled with disability labels: ADD, ADHD, Dyslexic, slow, below average, etc. These are the kids who experience failure almost dailyhustle-and-bustle-1738072_640 in school. These are the students who don’t realize how smart they are and that they have unlimited possibilities. They don’t realize they could go to college, start their own businesses, go to graduate school, seek a specialized career – in other words, choose exactly what they want to do!

What if we looked at these students from a learning strengths perspective? Here are some examples:

  • If a student needs to “say it out loud” in order to learn something, we would recognize the Verbal Learner, instead of thinking that student is disruptive.
  • If a student focuses better when doodling, we would recognize the Sketching Learner, instead of labeling the student ADD.
  • If a student does not learn spelling words by writing them over and over, we would recognize that this student is a non-print learner and find the modalities that do work, rather than saying this student is dyslexic.

When students are looked at through the lens of learning strengths, very few are labeled as disabled.

The students I see have often been labeled with a learning disability by their school. The first thing I do is give them a learning strengths assessment. This is such a no-brainer to me! Would you build a house without a blueprint? How can you know what will work for a student’s learning if you don’t have his learning needs blueprint?

Once I know the student’s Dispositions, Modalities, Interests, Talents, and Best Work Environment, we can move forward customizing a learning plan.

This is what Individualized Learning Plan (IEP) really means – customizing for a student’s strengths, and every single student should have one!

positive-954797_640 Then the magic happens:

  • a “dyslexic” student begins to listen to audio books and a couple of years later becomes a voracious reader
  • an “ADD” student is given the space to create, tinker, invent – and suddenly focus is no longer an issue
  • a student who supposedly has “low comprehension” begins to thrive when encouraged to draw her assignments

The possibilities are endless. When educators choose to focus on the learner’s strength, everything changes and truly no child is left behind.

copyright 2020 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
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