The Supportive Disposition

people talkingSupportive Disposition students need small group spaces that provide room to talk and discuss. They thrive in atmospheres that are interactive, cooperative, and fair. They love personal attention and focus on values and team spirit. They often “get in trouble” for talking too much.

College students with Supportive Dispositions can increase learning effectiveness by seeking out group discussions, group study, and cooperative assignments.

Do you know adults who have the Supportive Disposition? They bring harmony, cooperation, and sensitivity to a situation through discussion and talking things out. In the workplace, Supportive Dispositions thrive when their jobs involve interacting with people, discussing, and helping with problem issues. For example, they are perfect for customer service or human resources!

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

The Imaginative Disposition

Imaginative Disposition students need spaces that allow them to design, create, think, doodle or daydream. They learn best when the teaching materials and techniquguy thinkinges involve the arts or some type of creative process.

College students who have the Imaginative Disposition might do better in classes that encourage new ways of thinking, creative projects, and artistic expression.

Do you know adults who have the Imaginative Disposition? Their intentions to contribute ideas are often misunderstood. This Disposition is often viewed as illogical, aloof, spacy, or irresponsible.

Imaginative Dispositions usually thrive in work situations that are “behind the scenes” – quiet spaces and periods of time to create, compose, imagine, and design – and where time is not regimented.

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

The Curious Disposition

Curious Disposition students need flexible spaces that provide room for labs, kid experimentexperiments, and models. They thrive in atmospheres that encourage questioning, exploring, debating, and unscheduled time to work independently. Often, they ask lots of questions – about everything – because that’s how they learn best, not because they are trying to drive you crazy!

College students with a Curious Disposition can increase learning efficiency by incorporating drawing, constructing models, or using information maps.

Do you have adults in your life who have a Curious Disposition? They tend to get lost in their projects and forget about time. Their intention to stay focused on their work can lead to strained relationships. At work Curious Dispositions usually thrive in a workplace that involves experimenting, discovering, theories, building models, and coming up with solutions.

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

The Spontaneous Disposition

Spontaneous Disposition students need flexible spaces that provide lots of room to move around. They thrive in atmospheres that are fun and challenging and allow for unscheduled free time. They learn best during field trips and real-life learning situations. Does your child or student have a Spontaneous Disposition?

College students with a Spontaneous Disposition can increase learning efficiency by incorporating movement when studying: bounce a ball, jump on a trampoline, go for a walk or run while listening to audio lessons.

Is therebike in air a Spontaneous Disposition adult in your life? They tend to be perpetual fun-seekers and often delight in being “center stage.” Their intentions to bring fun and laughter are often interpreted as irresponsible or inconsiderate behavior. Spontaneous Dispositions usually thrive in a work situation that involves lots of moving, variety and even some adventure!

 

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

Happy, Successful, Contributing

A few years ago a young man came to my office for a consultation. He had just taken our Personal Success Power Traits Assessment and this was my first meeting with him. I found out that he was finishing his studies at community college and was planning his next steps. He was very clear about his areas of interest and career possibilities.

This was amazing in itself as so many young people have no idea what they want to do with their lives. But this is what really impressed me:

I asked him what he was hoping to get from the consultation. He replied that he was hoping my coaching could help him make choices that would:light atom

  1. create the happiest life possible
  2. make him successful in his own mind
  3. allow him to contribute to society

I thought, wow – most adults woud have difficulty articulating that.

This is our hope for all young people…that they might grow up discovering what they love, where their strengths lie, what they can contribute.

Confidence in oneself and belief that you can do something are the key ingredients for success in any area. Here at LearningSuccess™ Institute and Solimar Academy (our independent study program) we are passionate about helping young people (and not-so-young people) of all ages discover what makes them happiest, how to be successful, and the unique contributions they can make to the world.

teamwork

We believe that a school’s primary job is to prepare students to be happy, successful contributors to their communities and the world.

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

LearningSuccess™ Tip: Colors Matter

The effect of color on mood and activity has been studied for years, especially by media marketers. Color plays a big part in advertising, and marketers know which colors will get us to buy, to stay longer, to spend more, etc. We know that some colors depress and others energize, some are soothing and others make us feel rattled. Some colors slow us down, and some make us feel hyper.

Besides the general color principles that seem to apply to everyone, a person’s favorite colors can also dramatically affect mood and activity.

colorful-977289__180When we are surrounded by our favorite colors we tend to think more positively and feel more motivated. When surrounded by colors we don’t like, the opposite happens, and we can actually feel restless, upset, distracted, unhappy, even angry. Just as with any of the other elements of environment, some people are more sensitive to color and some are less sensitive.

At home, parents can help their children decide on how to incorporate favorite colors in designated areas. For the classroom, children can be encouraged to buy school supplies in their favorite colors.

Will having your favorite color around guarantee passing the test or getting an A on a paper? No, but color can substantially change mood and outlook, and it’s one more piece of the puzzle that can contribute to a more positive learning experience.

Talking to your children or students about colors they prefer is also another way of letting them know that you are listening and that their needs and preferences matter.

Children (and adults) can learn to:

  • Add favorite colors (to the extent possible) to a personal room, study space, desktop, or office in the form of paint, art, rugs, plants, furniture, pillows, or other accessories.
  • Use pens and notebooks in favorite colors when taking tests or doing other paperwork.color-1022016_960_720
  • Wear favorite colors to an important interview or other appointment.
  • Stay away from disliked colors!

And here is the result of a study done in classrooms which shows how powerful color can be!

“…When architects changed school room walls from orange and white to blue, students’ blood pressure dropped and their behavior and learning comprehension soared.” –Dr. Morton Walker

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

 

Learning That Works: Lesson from a Gardener

A few years ago I attended a presentation about gardening. The speaker said something that stuck in my head:

Roses

If a plant becomes diseased or is infested with pests, your first question should NOT be, what kind of pesticide should I use? Your first question should be, is this environment appropriate for this plant?

Wow – that is so simple and yet so profound!

Immediately, my thoughts went to education. What happens when a student is struggling in school? Normally, the first questions that are asked have to do with getting the student to fit in. Unfortunately, that often means, what medication should we use?

Instead, the first question ought to be, is this environment appropriate for this student? And if it’s not appropriate, should the student then be forced to adapt by using medication?

Every person, every child learns in different ways. We need to begin acknowledging and honoring each student’s strengths and focus on those. In order to be successful in sports, coaches capitalize on a star player’s strengths. What they DON’T do is force that player to spend hundreds of hours trying to build up a weakness.

Traditional education, whether at a school or at home, typically focuses on a student’s weaknesses.

The secret lies in focusing on strengths – then watch the magic happen.

If you know a student who is struggling with school, I hope you will make this your first question: Is this program appropriate for this student?

 
And, if it isn’t, search for an alternative that will bring success to that child.
 

copyright 2019 by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

Pledge for Learning Success

In our classes and workshops we hand out our Pledges for Learning Success. There is one for Parents, one for Teachers, one for Students, plus a personal pledge for creating life success. Here they are:Pledge Parent 2 short versionPledge TeacherPledge StudentPledge Adult

copyright 2019 by MPelullo-Willis & VKHodson, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute
contact Mariaemma: m@learningsuccesscoach.com
reflectiveed.com, aselfportraitonline.com, solimaracademy.com

 

Gratitude – A Time to Reflect

This time of year is a great time to reflect on all the things we are grateful for. A great family activity is to have everyone make lists of the qualities they love about each member of the family. Each person can have the option of writing down the lists (using paper, file cards, journal, or other creative format), or recording themselves (audio or video), or drawing or using cut out pictures or stickers (making posters, scrapbooks, paintings). These also make great gifts!

In fact, in place of one “regular” gift, how about reflecting on each of your children and making a colorful card for each of them that says:

  • What delights you about this particular child
  • What this child brings to the family that is uniqueKids
  • What it is about this child that you are most grateful for
  • What it is about this child that fascinates you the most
  • What it is about this child that you miss when you’re not with him/her

Our guess is that this simple gift will be the one that they will remember for years to come.

We believe that a parent is the number one Coach in a child’s life. Our C.A.R.E.S. principles begin with “C”—Celebrate your child! We hope that you celebrate your child often—each day of each year. This time of year can be a good reminder to stop, relax, and take a moment to really celebrate your child.

copyright 2019 by M. Pelullo-Willis & Victoria Kindle Hodson, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute

Relieving Homework Stress

scribblingMost kids dislike homework. They’ve been in school all day and now they are home and have to do more of the same. If it was up to us there would be little to no homework. However, since many students still get homework, here are a few learning style tips that could help relieve some of the stress.

Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners
Hands-On and Whole Body Learners need to move. They’ve already been sitting too long in school, and more sitting to do homework can literally be torture for them. Tips:

1. Teach them to take movement breaks
Set a timer for every 15 to 30 minutes (depending on age) – student works for that period then takes a break for 5 or 10 minutes: walks around the room, jumps rope, runs around outside, etc.

2. Exercise ball
Experiment with student sitting on an exercise ball – the slight, ongoing movement of the ball might be enough for the student to focus for longer periods.

3. Build movement into the work itself
For example, if a student has facts to memorize, try bouncing a ball in rhythm, or jumping rope, or bouncing on trampoline while rehearsing the information. Or, student can record the information to be memorized and then walk or jog while listening to the recording.

4. Stress balls
Encourage student to use stress balls or other squeeze toys while working.

5. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Picture Learners
Picture Learners need to see. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need visuals to increase comprehension and memory of what they are studying. Tips:

1. Teach them to find visuals and make use of them
Whatever topic a student is studying, chances are there is visual information available on the internet – pictures, charts, maps, as well as videos.

2. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Listening or Verbal Learners
Listening Learners need to hear the information spoken. Verbal Learners need to hear the sound of their own voices. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need audio to increase comprehension and memory of what they are studying. Tips:

1. Audiobooks
Whenever possible, provide audio versions of books and texts.

2. Hearing their own voices
Encourage students to read aloud, or record themselves reading the material to be studied and listening to it later.

3. Discussion
Provide opportunities for one-to-one or small group discussion, if possible.
copyright 2019 by M. Pelullo-Willis & Victoria Kindle Hodson, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute