Relieving Homework Stress

scribblingMost kids dislike homework. They’ve been in school all day and now they are home and have to do more of the same. If it was up to us there would be little to no homework. However, since many students still get homework, here are a few learning style tips that could help relieve some of the stress.

Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners
Hands-On and Whole Body Learners need to move. They’ve already been sitting too long in school, and more sitting to do homework can literally be torture for them. Tips:

1. Teach them to take movement breaks
Set a timer for every 15 to 30 minutes (depending on age) – student works for that period then takes a break for 5 or 10 minutes: walks around the room, jumps rope, runs around outside, etc.

2. Exercise ball
Experiment with student sitting on an exercise ball – the slight, ongoing movement of the ball might be enough for the student to focus for longer periods.

3. Build movement into the work itself
For example, if a student has facts to memorize, try bouncing a ball in rhythm, or jumping rope, or bouncing on trampoline while rehearsing the information. Or, student can record the information to be memorized and then walk or jog while listening to the recording.

4. Stress balls
Encourage student to use stress balls or other squeeze toys while working.

5. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Picture Learners
Picture Learners need to see. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need visuals to increase comprehension and memory of what they are studying. Tips:

1. Teach them to find visuals and make use of them
Whatever topic a student is studying, chances are there is visual information available on the internet – pictures, charts, maps, as well as videos.

2. Doodling
If student is a doodler encourage doodling or drawing things out while studying or solving a problem.

Listening or Verbal Learners
Listening Learners need to hear the information spoken. Verbal Learners need to hear the sound of their own voices. Even if they can read well, print might not be their best Modality, and they might need audio to increase comprehension and memory of what they are studying. Tips:

1. Audiobooks
Whenever possible, provide audio versions of books and texts.

2. Hearing their own voices
Encourage students to read aloud, or record themselves reading the material to be studied and listening to it later.

3. Discussion
Provide opportunities for one-to-one or small group discussion, if possible.
copyright 2019 by M. Pelullo-Willis & Victoria Kindle Hodson, Reflective Educational Perspectives, LLC / LearningSuccess™ Institute

 

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